Our 2018 Local Elections on Southern Vancouver Island: The Winners

 

Winnersby Guy Dauncey

Saturday October 20th was Election Day, and we had such great results! Of the 55 candidates who I recommended for your support, 38 were elected and 17 were not. In Courtenay and Comox progressive candidates were also elected, pushing out old-school conservatives.

This was my pitch for these candidates: I want Vancouver Island to become a place where people are really committed to living in harmony with nature.

I want our towns and cities to be full of safe bike lanes, wonderful green spaces, urban farms, affordable housing for all, great public transit, wonderful pedestrian environments, and to have permanently ended homelessness. Continue reading Our 2018 Local Elections on Southern Vancouver Island: The Winners

The Seven Phases of Climate Awareness

Climate Awareness

by Guy Dauncey

Which Phase Are You In?

Phase 1: Complete Unawareness. 

It’s simply not on your radar. You know more about Taylor Swift or Beyoncé than you do about climate change, or whatever it’s called.

Phase 2: What is This – is it Real?

I keep hearing about it, but it’s all so confusing. One person says one thing, someone else says another. So I’m reading blogs, articles, and even some books. trying to fathom it all out.

Phase 3: OMG, this is Awful. It looks like a Real Catastrophe.

Massive sea level rise? Huge droughts, storms and downpours? Freshwater running out? This is terrible. I read that the word most scientists use to describe the future if we don’t tackle the climate crisis is ‘catastrophic‘. Continue reading The Seven Phases of Climate Awareness

A Practical Plan for Affordable Housing in the Cowichan Valley

Home Everyone

by Guy Dauncey

What does it mean to be so worried, because you really can’t afford the rent? To have to surrender your hope of ever owning a home? To face the end of a rental lease and know that there is NOTHING out there that you can afford? To stare homelessness in the face?

Many of us are comfortably housed, but many are not. The autumn rains have arrived, and the harvest crops are being gathered in. Everyone seems to be getting on with their lives. And yet for many people, the smiles and kindnesses that make life worth living mask a level of stress and worry that should have no place in our community.

How can there be such a housing crisis?

How can it be that in this Cowichan Valley that we love so much, there is such a housing crisis? How can democracy, the housing market, and local government have failed us so completely?

Continue reading A Practical Plan for Affordable Housing in the Cowichan Valley

Brett Kavanaugh’s Better Angels

Halos

Like so many, I watched the Senate hearing on Brett Kavanaugh, transfixed. A lot of us do things in our teenage years that we later cringe at and regret. It’s how we handle our regrets later that matters, once the stupidities are done. What struck me first was how belligerent and defensive he was, and, how whiney.

What struck me next  is how he could if he had wished have adopted a much easier approach, and won the hearts of all Americans, of whatever political stripe. Since he seems unwilling to do that, I am willing to do it for him: Continue reading Brett Kavanaugh’s Better Angels

Let Us Advance Up The Ladder of Democracy

Ladder

by Guy Dauncey

Democracy is a very recent social invention. Most people don’t like it when the societies they live in are blatantly unfair, with privileges and glory for the rich and hard labour and exploitation for the poor. In consequence, starting a thousand years ago, people in nations all over the world have gradually prised power out of the hands of their ruling elites and established democracies.

It has been incredible hard work. In 1794, Thomas Hardy, a London shoemaker, was charged with high treason for proposing one person, one vote. His sentence, had he been found guilty, would have been to be hanged by the neck, cut down while still conscious, disemboweled, beheaded, and his body to have been cut up into quarters. Fortunately, a Grand Jury of nine respectable citizens, after debating the matter for nine days, found him ‘Not Guilty’. The London crowd went crazy, dragging him through the streets in triumph.

Continue reading Let Us Advance Up The Ladder of Democracy

Trump and Trudeau: Spot the Difference

Trump & Trudeau

Trudeau: ‘No country would find 173 billion barrels of oil in the ground and leave them there’

Trump: “We’ve got underneath us more oil than anybody … and I want to use it.”

I have very little to add to this. Emotionally, culturally, empathetically, educationally and behaviourally, Trump and Trudeau are as different as different can be. Trump is a bully, a braggard and a boor. Trudeau is a refined classical decoration on the carpet of civilization. Trump is a dirty stain.

Yet when it comes to energy and oil, their brains and their political instincts think alike. Trump is a proud climate denier. His “Grab them by the oil-wells” thoughts are at least consistent with his larger outlook, which is nationalist and mercantilist, as if the eighteenth century had never ended.

Continue reading Trump and Trudeau: Spot the Difference

Protecting the Coastal Douglas Fir Forest: Seven Practical Solutions

 

stock-photo-sun-rays-600x400

It cools us in the summer, it warms our hearts all year,

It provides a home for owls and flowers, for herons, cedars, fir.

It shapes the landscape, painting peace, away from the urban rush,

It protects our water all year round, surrendering it clear and fresh.

In Japanese, the word shinrin means forest and yoku means bath, so shinrin-yoku means ‘forest bath’: being immersed in the forest with all our senses. Listening to its quietness, seeing the variety of trees, mosses, lichens and rocks, tasting the air as you breathe in deeply, touching the rough Douglas fir and the smooth red arbutus, going barefoot across the earth, dipping your feet in a forest stream, lying down to gaze up at its beauty. Such bathing brings healing to the body, heart, mind and soul. Continue reading Protecting the Coastal Douglas Fir Forest: Seven Practical Solutions

BC’s Climate Intentions Papers: A Timid Response – and the Twelve Solutions We Really Need

Timid Response

August 20, 2018

I wish I didn’t have to write this. I count myself a friend of the NDP/Green Alliance, and I had high hopes for the government’s new climate action plans. [1]  

BC’s Ministry of Environment has published a series of Clean Growth Intentions Papers, with a deadline for public feedback of August 24th, in the heart of this fire and smoke-filled summer. In my head, I can see that they have been framed in a very positive way, emphasizing the multiple economic benefits of engaging in climate action, reframed as clean growth.

But the policies floated contain little that is new. They are really timid. And by downplaying the climate crisis almost to a state of mental non-existence, they have written the urgency out of the picture. In my heart, I feel as if they have been written by a holiday season policy-drone operating on auto-pilot. Hard words, but that’s what I feel.

Continue reading BC’s Climate Intentions Papers: A Timid Response – and the Twelve Solutions We Really Need

By Rewriting our Past, We can Rewrite our Future

Mint 2

Once upon a time, there was a revolution. I have never read about it in any history book, yet it was the ancestor of all revolutions, from the earliest slave revolts to the French and Russian revolutions, the gay rights movement and the #Metoo movement.

By not knowing about it, and not understanding its consequences, our interpretation of history is missing a critical dimension as we struggle to free ourselves from the tentacles of neoliberalism and build a new economy that is friendly to humans and nature, not just to bankers and greed. In the light of this revolution, our understanding of thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Marx, Owen, Kropotkin, Nietzsche, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Rand and Ostrom is changed.

We may never know when it happened, but a quarter million years ago is a good possibility. To understand its origins, however, we have to go back six million years, to when we shared a common ancestor with the chimpanzees and bonobos. Even today, we share 99% of our genes, and the same impulses to mother, to play, to help each other, to use social skills, to hunt together, to form tribes, to fight, to bully and to dominate.

Through it all, the non-alphas resented being dominated

Continue reading By Rewriting our Past, We can Rewrite our Future

Tiny Homes Villages

dt.common.streams.StreamServer.cls

Artwork by Richard Sheppard,  www.theartistontheroad.com

 

All I want is a village somewhere,

far away from the housing scare,

With friends and family,

Oh, wouldn’t it be loverly?

Little homes where we all can live,

A lovely garden so we all can eat,

Shared hearts, shared love, shared hopes,

Oh, wouldn’t it be loverly.

In May 2018 the average price of a home in BC was $750,000. In Victoria, the average price of a condo was $500,000.

Continue reading Tiny Homes Villages

Canada’s Choice

CanaDAS CHOICE 2

by Guy Dauncey

$4.5 Billion Dollars to Subsidize Fossil Fuels? Here’s a Much Better Idea

$4.5 billion of Canada’s money, to buy a bitumen pipeline? Some suggest that it could rise as high as $12 billion, including future construction and legal costs.

So what if the money was invested in solutions to the climate crisis, instead making things worse by being invested in the primary cause, which is our use of fossil fuels? When Canada signed the Paris Climate Agreement most people presumed that it was being signed honestly, not as an act of laugh-behind-your-hand hypocrisy.

Thirty to Fifty Times More Jobs

That much money could leverage enough electricity to replace most of Alberta’s coal and gas-fired electricity, and generate between 30 and 50 times as many jobs. It could also power 18 million electric vehicles for 25 years. Continue reading Canada’s Choice

Farm Villages – The Way of the Future

 

Farm-VillagesSubmission to the Agricultural Land Reserve Minister’s Advisory Committee by Guy Dauncey and Rob Buchan. Deadline for letters and submissions Monday April 30th 2018.

https://engage.gov.bc.ca/agriculturallandreserve/

For an illustrated slideshow on this proposal, see https://www.slideshare.net/GuyDauncey/farm-villages

Introduction

Throughout the world, in every culture, farmers have lived and raised their children in small farm villages.

Here on Vancouver Island, 95% of our food is imported every day on the ferries. At the same time, good farmland sits empty or grows hay, while younger people who want to get onto the land to grow food are unable to do so because of the incredibly high price of land.

Continue reading Farm Villages – The Way of the Future

Let’s Make Every Business a Social Purpose Business

 

Social-PurposeBy Guy Dauncey, March 2018

If we are to live in a fair, just, ecologically sustainable world, many things in our economy will need to change, from the way banks create money to the way environmental losses and gains are accounted for and measured.

Let’s start with the businesses that grow the food, manufacture the products and provide the services we all depend on and enjoy.

It’s almost impossible to imagine a successful economy without its businesses. The Soviet Union tried, and Cuba is still trying, but neither has had much success. It’s hard to have success when the spirit of enterprise is not allowed to flourish. Continue reading Let’s Make Every Business a Social Purpose Business

The Birth of a New Cooperative Economy

They say we are self-interested, we’re always out to win.
Always individualistic, though it used to be a sin.
They say we need free markets, the better to compete,
and the economy will flourish if we only think of greed.

This is Economics 101, the way it’s taught today. Not a word about nature, community, caring, sharing, or cooperation.

During the mid 19th century, advances in science, democracy, education, literacy, public healthcare, labour unions, technological breakthroughs, banking, and the power of fossil fuels to generate rapid economic growth certainly made it seem that after ten thousand years of economic stagnation the competitive pursuit of profit was improving life for all. In the 1760s it took eighteen hours of human labour to transform a pound of cotton into cloth. By the 1860s it took one and a half hours. Today, it probably takes five seconds.

Continue reading The Birth of a New Cooperative Economy

Let Us Create An EcoRenaissance

by Guy Dauncey, February 2nd, 2018

If you want to see what this EcoRenaissance looks like on the ground, click HERE.

Until a thing has a name, it doesn’t really exist

I can feel this future. I have written a novel about it. I love its colour and vibrancy, its harmony with Nature. But what is its name?

One of the realities of the spoken language is that until a thing has a name, it doesn’t really exist. When we want to create something, we name it.

The feeling that comes to mind is one of Renaissance – the birth of a new vision, the promise of a new future. The Renaissance that was seeded in the 13th century and blossomed into glory in the 15th and sixteenth centuries filled people’s hearts, souls and minds with art, imagination and ideas. It took inspiration from the rediscovered science, art and philosophy of ancient Greece and Rome. It made souls take flight, washing away the dull dogmatism and cruel muddy feudalism of a world where nothing much changed except by disease, disorder and death.

Continue reading Let Us Create An EcoRenaissance

To Dam, or Not to Dam? An Ode to the Peace River

Peace

To dam, or not to dam: that is the question,

whether tis nobler to suffer

the loss of farmland and First Nations rights by powerful flooding,

or, by solar, wind and conservation, geothermal too,

to craft another path to the energy we’ll need

and save the land for growing food and flowing water,

under the peaceful sky.

 – Guy Dauncey, January 2018

Mammoths on East Hastings Street: A Vision from the Future

Mammoths Sculpture

Mammoths on Hastings Street, by Hae Jin An, Emily Carr School of Art

This is an extract from Chapter 12 ‘The Heart of Poverty’ in Guy Dauncey’s ecotopian novel Journey to the Future: A Better World is Possible, set in Vancouver in June 2032.

*

‘The Land that Ugly Forgot’

Back on the trail, I passed a sign that told me that Fourth Avenue was closed to cars every Sunday, and open only to cyclists, rollerbladers, runners and strollers.[1] I rode north over the Cambie Street Bridge, crossing the waters of Vancouver’s False Creek. To see the banners of colored silk fluttering from the streetlights and the central median ablaze with rhododendrons and flowers set my soul ablaze. A banner at the end of the bridge proclaimed ‘The Land that Ugly Forgot’ and welcomed me to the downtown.

I cycled to Wei-Ping’s office on Water Street in Gastown and found a space to park Carl’s bike in a bike-rack designed like a red dragon. I had a while before my meeting, so I walked to the Waterfront station and turned up Seymour, enjoying the wide sidewalks, ample bike-lanes and colorful food carts. Several buildings were covered with ferns and flowering plants tumbled down their walls, as if a rainforest had taken up residence in the city. [2] At a crosswalk, instead of saying WALK it said DANCE, and there was music that made it impossible not to—not just me but others too, laughing and smiling at each other. [3]

Continue reading Mammoths on East Hastings Street: A Vision from the Future

Canada’s Housing Crisis: A Permanent, 100-Year Solution

100-Years

Guy Dauncey is the author of Journey to the Future: A Better World is Possible and nine other books. He is an Honorary Member of the Planning Institute of BC and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.

June 2017. This is an updated and expanded version of Canada’s Housing Crisis: 22 Solutions, originally published on The Practical Utopian in December 2016.

A PDF Version of this essay can be downloaded here: Canada’s Housing Crisis – Guy Dauncey.

Executive Summary

Canada’s housing crisis is far more severe than most people realize. The fundamental problem is an excess of money pouring into the housing market from various sources, combined with an abdication of responsibility by all levels of government for the past 30 years.

There are many on-the-ground solutions, demonstrating positive ways to build affordable housing. And there are seven new housing-related taxes that could raise the funds needed for a massive expansion of affordable housing.

The fundamental cause of the problem is the excess of funds flowing into the market, and until this is solved house prices will continue to rise, and most other solutions will seem like never-ending sandbagging.

The money supply problem can be solved. The money can be obtained to restore safe, sustainable, socially designed affordable housing as a fundamental human right.

And by establishing an Affordable Housing Social Justice Connector, a permanent, hundred-year solution can be put in place that will guarantee that Canada need never confront a housing crisis again. Continue reading Canada’s Housing Crisis: A Permanent, 100-Year Solution

What Shall We Call The New Economy We Need So Much?

Seventy-Four Names

Names-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an expanded Appendix 1 to my essay A New Cooperative Economy.

Until something has a name, it hardly exists. So what shall we call the new economy that we need so much? These are all proposed names that I have harvested from my reading. If you know of another, let me know, and I will add it. Updated to 74 names on November 21st 2017.

So which do you prefer? I apologize that this website is not sophisticated enough to allow for scoring. Click MORE to see the list… Continue reading What Shall We Call The New Economy We Need So Much?

Book Review: The Clean Money Revolution – Reinventing Power, Purpose and Capitalism

by Joel Solomon with Tyee Bridge

New Society Publishers, April 2017.  Review by Guy Dauncey.

https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-29848273-128228813157-1-original

This is a great book. It’s personal, committed, passionate, informative, and full of great stories. For an addicted change-the-worlder, what more can you ask?

And the stories, from Joel’s personal life and those of his colleagues, are about one of the most important challenges we need to embrace on our planet – changing the way we invest our money.

Continue reading Book Review: The Clean Money Revolution – Reinventing Power, Purpose and Capitalism

The World’s Central Banks to the Rescue

by Guy Dauncey, inspired by Matthias Kroll

PDF download available here: The Boldest Climate Solution

A globally agreed carbon cap? Carbon rationing? Holland’s proposed ban on the sale of non-electric cars by 2025? Oslo’s goal to reduce the city’s total greenhouse gas emissions by 95% by 2030?

No, none of the above.

So what is it? In a nutshell, it’s the proposal that the world’s central banks create $300 billion a year, and use it to leverage investments of up to $2 trillion a year in the urgently needed transition to renewable energy, and other climate solutions.

Continue reading The World’s Central Banks to the Rescue

A New Cooperative Economy

Guy Dauncey, April 2017

essay-3

This essay was submitted to The Next Systems Project Essay Contest, in which is was awarded second place. “We received hundreds of submissions from 30 different states and 26 countries, proving that many around the world not only believe system change is necessary, but have thought long and hard about what a new system should look like and how we might get there.” http://thenextsystem.org/announcing-the-winners-in-our-essay-competition/ 

http://thenextsystem.org/…/2017/04/Dauncey_AtLargeSecond.pdf

You can download the essay as a PDF here. A New Cooperative Economy

*

Our task is to fashion a political vision and a political narrative that is a compelling answer to neo-liberalism and the ideology of competition, free markets, and the primacy of capital. We need a political economy of cooperation, solidarity, of mutual benefit. –  John Restakis, Civil Power and the Partner State, 2016

Our modern economy is in crisis. Can we build an alternative economy as our ancestors did in the transition from feudalism to capitalism? It’s a question that takes us deep into our values, culture, history, politics—and visions of the future.

Continue reading A New Cooperative Economy

The Blob: Can We Change its Heart, Before it Destroys Us All?

Sometimes it seems as if those who care about Nature stand on guard around the edge of a huge circular Blob known as ‘The Economy’, which keeps growing and encroaching onto Nature. We organize to prevent its advance against creeks, rivers, forests and wetlands. We try to stop it from shooting out new pipelines, digging new coalmines, pouring more carbon into the atmosphere and introducing new chemicals into our food.

Sometimes we are successful and The Blob backs off, which happened with the proposed Raven coalmine near Courtenay. But just as often we are not, as the ecological wreckage of the private forest lands on the Island shows, and when The Blob assaults Nature in a distant country such as Indonesia, destroying native hardwood forests, home for millions of years to families of orangutans and other creatures, replacing them with palm oil trees for the global biofuel market.

Continue reading The Blob: Can We Change its Heart, Before it Destroys Us All?

A New Economy for Small Communities

by Guy Dauncey

When the future teenager walks down the future Main Street in future Smalltown BC, be it Williams Lake, Smithers, Houston, Creston or Kimberley, which of these thoughts might she or he be thinking?

“I can’t wait to get out of this place—it’s so, like, basic.”

or

“This place is so cool. I wish there was work, so that I could stay.”

or

“This place is so über-cool. My friends in the city are so jealous that I get to live, work and play here.”

British Columbia has many communities that built their economies around traditional resources that are now either collapsing or going into decline. Unless there’s a strong impulse for community economic renewal, there’s a risk that working people will leave and young people will follow, never to return.

Continue reading A New Economy for Small Communities

Let’s Get Going – Climate Action Together

 

Lets-Get-Going

F is for Future, a world without fossil fuels,

new solar symphony changing the gyre,

clean up our garbage, restore Nature’s harmony,

offer our children the hopes they desire.

To download the PDF version of this paper, click Climate Action Together

So how do we do it?[1]

How do we tackle the climate crisis with the speed and resolution that the climate scientists say is so urgently needed?

How do we make a rapid transition to a 100% renewable energy economy in a positive, nation-building manner, without causing economic mayhem, unemployment and chaos?

It’s complicated. There’s no doubt about it. Our economy is completely enmeshed in fossil fuels. We use fossil fuels to travel, to heat our homes and buildings, to generate electricity, to power our industry, to make plastics and to pave the roads. If fossil fuels were to magically stop working due to a zombie-ray from outer space or an unexpected change in the laws of physics, our economy would grind to an immediate halt. Continue reading Let’s Get Going – Climate Action Together

When Santa Lost His Reindeer

Santa

It was a week before Christmas, and Santa was busy polishing his boots in the big Winter House, up at the North Pole. It was a pleasant evening, and he was feeling good about life.

“My, don’t these boots look good!” he said to himself as he sat in front of the big log fire, admiring his reflection in the polish. “That should make a show when I’m ready to do my rounds!”

Most of the presents were neatly stacked in the Store House ready for delivery, and the reindeer were asleep in the barn, resting up before the big journey.

All except one, that is – Binky.

Continue reading When Santa Lost His Reindeer

A Modern Alphabet

Alphabet

 Thanks to Terry Sohl for the photo image, and to William Morris for the letters.

Opportunities to perform this are welcome. I hope to get it on YouTube soon. 

william-morris-letter-a

A is for Albatross

A is for Albatross,

far-winging freely across oceans of wonder,

mating for life till they die,

but their chicks have a diet of grim plastic plunder,

filling their bellies with lies.

Continue reading A Modern Alphabet

A Bold New Climate Vision: If I was Prime Minister of Canada, How Would I Tackle The Climate Crisis?

Bold

By Guy Dauncey

New Scientist magazine reported in June that five meters of future sea-level rise is already locked in, due to the steady collapse of the West Antarctic Ice-Sheet. If we don’t act rapidly, their staff reported, it will be twenty metres.

The full extent of the flooding will not happen for several thousand years, but “locked-in” is the phrase they used.[1] Venice, New York, Miami, San Francisco, Vancouver, London, Mumbai, Kolkata; large parts of Holland; a large part of Bangladesh and many cities in China—all will be under water.[2]

Continue reading A Bold New Climate Vision: If I was Prime Minister of Canada, How Would I Tackle The Climate Crisis?

Almost Twice as Many Green Jobs if Canada Phases out Fossil Fuels

Almost

by Guy Dauncey

The 48-Page Report is here.

Is It Really True?

Is it really true that if we don’t build more pipelines and allow more exports of coal, oil and gas, that Canada’s economy will be in danger and unemployment will rise?

That’s certainly what we are frequently told, both by the Conservative federal government and by several provincial governments, either directly or by implied assumption.

There is alternative, however. The climate crisis is inescapably real. It threatens everyone’s future, and it is being caused by carbon emissions from the same fossil fuels that our governments want to expand.

So what would it look like if there were an organized plan to phase out fossil fuels and embrace 100% renewable energy in Canada? That’s certainly what the climate crisis calls for. Continue reading Almost Twice as Many Green Jobs if Canada Phases out Fossil Fuels

The Green Diary, October 2018

Green Diary

A Host of Amazing Events to Build a Better World

Patiently Organized by Amazing People

www.thepracticalutopian.ca/category/green-diary/

250-924-1445 guydauncey@earthfuture.com

More events on Creatively United’s Events Diary https://creativelyunited.org/events/

EcoPersonals

Land Trust Alliance of British Columbia 2018 Nature Photography and Art Exhibit now open to all artists in BC. Non-Juried, Exhibit in November and Prizes. Entry Details: Https://Ltabc.Ca/News/Art-And-Photography-Exhibit-2018/ Deadline October 25 2018

Municipal Election Candidates and All-Candidates Meetings: www.timescolonist.com/elections

Are you Registered to Vote?  https://eregister.electionsbc.gov.bc.ca/ovr/welcome.aspx#

The Proportional Voting Referendum: Get all the details:  https://elections.bc.ca/referendum  and  www.fairvote.ca/pr4bc/

WEEK ONE

Mon 1, 9am Site C Still Sucks. we will attempt to meet MLAs as they arrive at the Legislature, to remind them that Site C Still Sucks and many of us are still opposed to the Site C Dam. Meet south side of the Legislature. www.facebook.com/events/273046976649621/

Mon 1-Fri 5 Walk and Wheel to School Week, in 33 schools across the capital region. Hosted by the CRD with support from Island Health and CRD Traffic and Safety Commission. www.crd.bc.ca/walkwheel.

Tue 2, 5:30pm Join the Clean Money Revolution: How to use your investments to change the world. Joel Solomon, impact investment pioneer and author of “The Clean Money Revolution“, and co-founder of Renewal Funds, joins World Tree for an informative and lively evening of discussion and mingling on how we can use our investment dollars to create the social and environmental changes we need to see in the world. Joel’s books will also be available for purchase. Tickets $10 includes one free drink and appetizers: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/join-the-clean-money-revolution-how-to-use-your-investments-to-change-the-world-tickets-49228761551

Tue 2, 9, 16, 23.  Mushrooms:From War to Welfare: The Strange Partnerships of Fungi and Plants. UVic Continuing Studies Course. Fee, to register see https://continuingstudies.uvic.ca/science-and-ecological-restoration/series/fungi-and-plants-series.  UVic campus.

Tue 2-27, 6:30-8:30pm From War to Welfare: The Strange Partnerships of Fungi and Plants. In this course, four Victoria scientists will lead us through this world between the plants and fungi. This course consists of five stand-alone sessions: you can register for a single session or receive a discounted rate if you register for the entire series. Register on-line or call 250-472-4747 so we can guarantee you a space. Fee: $24.00 plus tax per session.https://continuingstudies.uvic.ca/science-and-ecological-restoration/series/fungi-and-plants-series

Tue 2, 7pm Tailings dam spills at Mount Polley and Mariana: Chronicles of disasters foretold. A public talk with Judith Marshall and Bruno Milanez.. A Corporate Mapping Project report takes a close look at the mining disasters at Mount Polley and Mariana and reveals remarkable similarities in these disasters but also in the corporate, governmental and civil society responses afterwards. Corporate Mapping Project, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – BC, University of Victoria, and Wilderness Committee. Room 105, Hickman Building, UVic. Free, but please register at: www.ccpabc.ca/tailings_spills_vic

Wed 3, 7:30-9pm Dance for DemocracyCreativelyUnited.org founder and community connector, Frances Litman, will facilitate this fun, free community event that incorporates laughter, art and even dance with knowledge about this fall’s historic referendum and why it’s vital to vote Yes for Proportional Representation. Church of Truth – Community of Conscious Living, 111 Superior St., Victoria.  https://creativelyunited.org/event/dance-for-democracy/

Thur 4, 7pm David Suzuki and Peter Wohlleben: Trees, Animals and the Sacred Balance of All Living Things. Alix Goolden Performance Hall, 907 Pandora Ave.Moderated by Gregor Graigie. Tickets $20 at Munro Books, the Alix Goolden Box office, 900 Johnson St. and online atTicketfly.com Presented by Greystone Books, the David Suzuki Foundation, and Munro Books

Thur 4, 7pm Protect the Coast, launch of exhibit of oil paintings by local artist, Dyane Brown at Nanaimo Art Council  gallery, 78 Wharf  St. “All this is threatened by the proposed Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. My show is a celebration of our coastal waters and a tribute to the people who are acting to protect it. Coast Protectors is a project of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.  www.coastprotectors.ca

Thur 4, 7pm The Best of Mushroamin’ with Daniel Winkler. This presentation features stunning mushroom images and stories from ten years of “Mushroaming.” (a term coined by Daniel for his mushroom-themed eco-adventures that explore the fungi of exotic destinations). Whether traveling in rugged High Asia (Tibet and Bhutan), his native Alps, tropical South America (Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, and Suriname), or wild North America, Daniel is always on the lookout for choice edibles, potent medicinals, and all kinds of bizarre and colourful fungi. Free, open to all, SVIMS membership encouraged. South Vancouver Island Mycological Society. Pacific Forestry Centre.

Thur 4, 7pm The Future of Jerusalem in the Time of Trump, with Jonathan Kuttab, a Palestinian-American lawyer and human rights advocate and a founder of Al Haq, an independent Palestinian non-governmental human rights organization based in Ramallah, West Bank. In 2018, he cofounded Just Peace Advocates, a Canadian organization whose focus is the defence of the human rights of people who support Palestine. David Turpin Building A104), Sponsored by Social Justice Studies, UVic, Just Peace Advocates and Al Haq

Thur 4, 7pm Transportation and the October 20th Elections. BC Sustainable Energy Association: Sustainable fun evening on how to pin the candidates down on their commitments. Come early for dinner. BCSEA and Victorians for Transportation Choice (http://transportchoicevic.ca) The Oaks, 2250 Oak Bay Avenue.

Fri 5, 11am – 1:30pm Jonathan Kuttab: Palestine at the Crossroads: A Human Rights Perspective. First Metropolitan United Church Room 119, entrance at 932 Balmoral Road (at Quadra Street). A light vegetarian lunch from Fig restaurant will be available by donation. Sponsored by Development and Peace, Caritas Canada, First Metropolitan United Church, Independent Jewish Voices Victoria, KAIROS Victoria, Just Peace Advocates and Al Haq. Larry Hannant – hannant@shaw.ca or 250 380 0462

Sat 6, 11am Save-A-Turkey Trot 5k fun run/trot/walk. Meet at Clover Point, goes along the scenic walking paths, organized by OrganicAthlete Victoria. Half the $5 entry goes to A Home for Hooves & RASTA animal sanctuaries, great draw prizes, all the details at http://victoria.organicathlete.org/turkeytrot

Sat 6, 6-9pm Thanksliving Vegan Community Potluck. 3320 Cedar Hill Road. www.facebook.com/events/231968707667696/

Sat 6, 1-9pm Harvest Feastival at OUR EcoVillage, Shawningan Lake. https://www.facebook.com/events/837016263355174/

Sat 6, 11am-3pm Transition Sooke’s 3rd annual Eco Home Tour.  Featuring some from last year and some new, including a rammed earth house, a tiny home, Harmless Home, an Econest and more. “Tickets available on day of tour at Stick In the Mud Coffee Shop on Eustace Rd. in Sooke from 10:00 – 1:00 and at each participating venue.” $5/person; $10/carload; pedestrians and cyclists free.  transitionsooke.org/sooke-ecohome-tour/ and evensi.com/sooke-ecohome-tour-3/267712628

Sun 7, 1-3pm No Ivy League Join Friends of Uplands Park at Cattle Pt to remove the English ivy carpet of death.  Tools, gloves and instruction provided.

WEEK TWO

Tue 9, 10am to 12pm. A Contemplative Exploration of our Embeddedness and Identity with the Unfolding Universe, with Gertie Jocksch SC We will explore our place in the universe through a contemplative process to help us develop a sense of embeddedness and identity with the unfolding universe. Four Tuesdays. 75.00 or $20 drop in 250-220-460/250-888-7501 Please do not let cost deter you, call us.  programs@earthliteracies.org   www.earthliteracies.org   Friends Meeting House, 1831 Fern St. Victoria

Tue 9, 5-7pm Victoria Green Drinks. Great beer, great company. The Drake Eatery, 507 Pandora.

Tue 9, 7:30pm. Natural History Night: In the deep past lie answers to who we are and where we came from. A talk about cave art from Ice-age hunters by Sid Tafler. Victoria Natural History Society. Rm 159 Fraser Building, Uvic. http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca

Wed 10, 7pm Era of Megafires and post-screening discussion with Jens Wieting, Forest and Climate Campaigner with Sierra Club.  Why have wildfires gotten worse and what can we do about it?  Film combines the research of Dr. Paul Hessberg, Pacific Northwest Research Station, U.S. Forest Service with the visual storytelling of award-winning film company North 40 Productions. Awareness Film Night Season Premiere. Edward Milne Community School theatre 6218 Sooke Rd. in Sooke. By donation. awarenessfilmnight.ca

Thur 11, 5pm Imagining Greater Victoria as a Zero Waste Region. Speakers: Paula and Nairn McPhee, The Zero Waste Emporium; Leanne Gallagher from West Coast Refill. Conversation for a One Planet Region, Central Branch of the Public Library on Broughton St.

Thur 11, 6:30pm Cowichan Town Hall on a National Housing Strategy.  Lecture Theatre, VIU Cowichan, 2011 University Way, Duncan. www.facebook.com/events/276834116485335/

Sat 13, 9:30am – Sun 5pm Forests Activism Training Weekend. UVic. Hosted by the Sierra Club of BC. http://www.facebook.com/events/345274182909028/

Sat 13, 1-4pm  The Great Rip-Off …in Uplands Park.  Rip off English ivy that is forming a carpet of death and strangling tree…along with other invasive aliens.  Bring your friends, family and muscles.  Tools, gloves provided.  Meet at the Beach Drive entrance to Cattle Point. All ages. Kids love to do this!  The entire community needs to be part of the solution to save the endangered Garry Oak Ecosystem.

Sun 14, 1-4pm The Great Rip-Off …in Uplands Park.  Rip off English ivy that is forming a carpet of death and strangling tree…along with other invasive aliens.  Bring your friends, family and muscles.  Tools, gloves provided.  Meet at the Beach Drive entrance to Cattle Point. All ages.  Kids love to do this!  The entire community needs to be part of the solution to save the endangered Garry Oak Ecosystem.

Sun 14, 3pm, 5pm, 7pm Canadian film Anthropocene at Cinecenta at UVic. Q&A with Jennifer Baichwal, the director. https://www.edwardburtynsky.com/projects/films/anthropocene-the-human-epoch/

Sun 14, 4pm Changemakers: Embracing Hope, Taking Action, and Transforming the World, with the Gabriola authors, Fay Weller and Mary Wilson. A guidebook for ordinary people creating a more just and ecological society. The book explores transformative learning and presents powerful stories of everyday people who have changed their lives, communities, and wider society. The book is based on the Gulf Islands and illustrates how local action has global significance. Spiral Café, Vic West, 418 Craigflower Road, Victoria – More information https://www.newsociety.com/Events/Changemakers-Events

Sun 15-Thur 18, 7pm and 9pm Canadian film Anthropocene at Cinecenta at UVic. https://www.edwardburtynsky.com/projects/films/anthropocene-the-human-epoch/

WEEK THREE

Mon 15, 11am The Joyful Imperative, with Guy Dauncey. When the climate crisis, the ecological crisis, the inequality crisis and a whole lot more all stare you in the face, saying “Bite me!”, how can you respond? There’s only one rational response: to locate the solutions, and get to work. Transform business. Transform tourism. Transform trade. Transform the economy. Free. At Royal Roads, Part of Global Sustainable Development Goals and Tourism Student Symposium. For location details, contact Catherine Evans Catherine.3evans@RoyalRoads.ca

Tue 16, 7:30pm. Theobroma cacao – a botanical history. A talk by David Mincey about the cultivation of chocolate and its role in societies to the present day. Victoria Natural History Society. Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature House. See  http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca

Wed 17, 7-11pm  Stephen Jenkinson – Nights of Grief & Mystery. Weaves together the talents and skills of internationally renowned author, teacher, storyteller, and cultural activist Stephen Jenkinson with Toronto-based singer-songwriter Gregory Hoskins and his band. This an evening for young folk and old folk, for elders in training—an event of interest to parents and grandparents, teachers, scholars, health care professionals, clergy, counselors, and anyone else pondering matters around human development, rites of passage, aging, and wisdom. This will be an exclusive all evening event at OUR Ecovillage beginning with a dinner, concert, and aftergathering with appetizers for those who want to start and continue the night in celebration with us. Dinner: 6:00pm Concert: 7:00pm  http://www.facebook.com/events/746664612351059/

Thur 18, 10 am – 5 pm A Nourishing Day in Nature at Mary Lake Nature Sanctuary. A Retreat day with Gertie Jocksch to reconnect and explore the many healing fits gifts available to us. $65. Bring lunch, refreshments are served 250-220-460/250-888-7501  Please do not let cost deter you, call us. programs@earthliteracies.org   www.earthliteracies.org Mary Lake Nature Sanctuary, 1772 Millstream Rd. Victoria (Do you need a ride or can you offer a ride, please let us know)

Thur 18, 7pm and Sat 21, 2pm Swan Lake Wild Mushroom Course. Thursday talk: Introduction to Mushrooms – The essential elements of mushroom biology, uses and ID. Instructor: Andy MacKinnon. Sunday walk: Wild Mushrooms in the Field – Techniques for field identification. Instructor: Kem Luther. Cost for both workshops: $54 for members (Swan Lake or SVIMC), $60 for non-members. Please call 250.479.0211 or stop by the Swan Lake Nature House to register.  Swan Lake Nature House.

Thur 18-Nov 8, 8:00-8:30pm Emerging Ecology Research Series. Grad students in UVic Environmental Studies share their research in this series of three presentations. Learn about the incredible diversity of primate species, find out how shipwrecks form artificial reefs in our local harbours, and learn how Indigenous peoples traditionally managed the local landscape. You may register for a single session or receive a discount if you register for all three. Register on-line or call 250-472-4747 so we can guarantee you a space. Fee: $21.00 plus tax per session. https://continuingstudies.uvic.ca/science-and-ecological-restoration/series/emerging-ecology-research-series

Thur 18, 7-9:30pm Stephen Jenkinson – Nights of Grief & Mystery Weaves together the talents and skills of internationally renowned author, teacher, storyteller, and cultural activist Stephen Jenkinson with Toronto-based singer-songwriter Gregory Hoskins and his band. This an evening for young folk and old folk, for elders in training—an event of interest to parents and grandparents, teachers, scholars, health care professionals, clergy, counselors, and anyone else pondering matters around human development, rites of passage, aging, and wisdom. www.facebook.com/events/209024909724843/

Sat 20, 8am-8pm Municipal and Regional District Elections. Please vote for your favourite candidates to lead your community for the next four years.

Sat 20, 10 am-8 pm & Sun 21, 8:30 am-1pm Youth Food Gathering brings together over 100 youth between the ages of 14-24. Hands-on workshops and networking sessions on cooking, gardening, local food, culturally diverse food, healthy food, nutrition, and more. Quadra Village Community Centre and downtown locations. Tickets $0-$30 at https://www.youthfoodnetwork.ca/youth-food-gathering-2018

Sat 20, 1:30pm Yellow Point Ecological Society AGM, with special guests Finn and Chloe Unger, two youngsters from Sooke who have created Project HOWL, to raise awareness and end the killing of wolves. 13561 Barney Road, Yellow Point. www.yellowpointecologicalsociety.ca

Sun 21, 9:45 to 1pm Greater Victoria Green Team joins Friends of Uplands Park to remove invasive plants.  Meet at the Beach Drive entrance to Cattle Pt.  Tools, gloves, refreshments provided.

Sun 21, 1-3pm Guided Tour of Wildwood EcoForest with zoologist Bruce Hepburn. Enjoy the beauty of this old growth forest on Quennell Lake. Learn firsthand how Merv Wilkinson harvested timber from this forest while maintaining a vibrant healthy ecosystem.  By donation (suggested $10-$20). Advance registration required.  For more info visit http://www.ecoforestry.ca  or email education@ecoforestry.ca Sun 21,

Sun 21, 1-3pm No Ivy League Join Friends of Uplands Park at Cattle Pt to remove the English ivy carpet of death.  Tools, gloves and instruction provided.

WEEK FOUR

Mon 22 – Nov 2 Proportional Voting Referendum: Get all the details: https://elections.bc.ca/referendum/

Wed 24, 7:30pm Birds on the Edge. A talk by Bruce Wittington on the birds of the western edge of our continent and how they are sadly on the edge in other ways. Victoria Natural History Society. Rm 159 Fraser Building, UVic. Web site –  http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca

Wed 24, 7pm More Bulbs for Your Buck This autumn is your chance to make a fresh start to creating a striking and extraordinary garden! You might think that planting bulbs is a lot of work with little reward. This is the furthest thing from the truth. Jeff de Jong is going to transform your garden into a place that will continue to flourish and be more beautiful year after year. This talk will focus on design and bulb choices that will add beauty and value to any yard. Register on-line or call 250-472-4747 so we can guarantee you a space. Fee: $28.00 plus tax. https://continuingstudies.uvic.ca/science-and-ecological-restoration/courses/more-bulbs-for-your-buck

Thur 25, 7pm Charles Eisenstein: Re-villaging: A New Story of Community. At OUR Ecovillage, Shawnigan Lake. www.facebook.com/events/348551965888865/

Thur 25, 6:30pm Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition AGM, with Dale Bracewell, Vancouver Manager of Transportation Planning, on the amazing work Vancouver has been doing building an active transportation network, from protected bike lanes to the Arbutus Green Line. Uptown Mall www.facebook.com/events/2232761140131409

Fri 26, 1:30pm Crisis, Passion and Action: The Climate Crisis Needs YOU! With Guy Dauncey. The climate crisis is getting starker and more dangerous every year. Our response, therefore, needs to become bolder and more courageous. The timing is good for pressure on the federal and provincial governments to address the crisis not with more oil and LNG but with policies and commitments that are not timid but bold and courageous. The meeting will include action. Guy Dauncey has worked in the climate trenches for 20+ years. He is founder of the BC Sustainable Energy Association and the author of two books on climate solutions, including The Climate Challenge: 101 Solutions to Global Warming. As preparation, read Guy’s Tyee article on BC’s Climate Intentions Papers: A Timid Response and the Twelve Solutions We Really Needhttps://bit.ly/2R7wuIk St. John the Divine, Quadra St. World Federalists, Bill Pearce, 250-595-4994.

Sat 27, 9:30am-12:30pm Repair Café Victoria. What do you do with a  hole sweater, a broken toaster, or a busted teddy bear? Don’t toss it! Bring it in to Repair Café Victoria where volunteer repair experts will be on hand to teach you how to fix your broken household items. By donation. Central Branch of the Greater Victoria Public Library, 735 Broughton Street. www.facebook.com/repaircafevictoria

Sat 27, 8am, Birding in Uplands Park with expert Geoffrey Newell of Friends of Uplands Park.  Bring binoculars and meet at Cattle Point.  8 years and older.

Sun 28, 10am-4pm SVIMS Annual Mushroom Show.  Mushrooms on display, labelled, workshops, tastings, and talks all day.  Free (by donation). Location: Cordova Bay 55 Plus Center, 5238 Cordova Bay Rd., Victoria BC.

Sun 28, 1-3pm No Ivy League. Join Friends of Uplands Park at Cattle Pt to remove the English ivy carpet of death.  Tools, gloves and instruction provided.

Mon 29, 7:30pm Fish and motile invertebrates of First Nations’ clam gardens. PhD. candidate Morgan Black will talk about her research on the ecology and biodiversity of ancient clam gardens. Victoria Natural History Society. Rm 159 Fraser Building, UVic. –  http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca

 

All Month

CRD Parks hikes, explorations and events for all ages: www.crd.bc.ca/about/events

Change the World on Shaw TV, with Guy Dauncey. Interviews with local people who have big bold ideas and positive solutions for the future. Shaw TV Channel 4. www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRSwDpSO92L1Li1FSwQpzy2leOk_8VdFo

More Local Events (including hikes): http://creativelyunited.org/events/

Meet-Ups:

Affinite Wealth Group: http://www.meetup.com/Affinite-Wealth-Victoria/

Victoria Cycling Adventures: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-Cycling-Adventures/

Victoria Outdoor and Social Club: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-outdoor-social-club/

Victoria Club Tread: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-Club-Tread/

Victoria Nature Explorations: http://www.meetup.com/Nature-Victoria-Explorations/

Victoria Nature Walks: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-Nature-Walks/

Victoria Outdoor Club: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-Outdoor-Club/

Victoria Sea Kayakers: http://www.meetup.com/Victoria-Sea-Kayakers/

Vegan Victoria: http://www.meetup.com/Vegan-Victoria-Meetup/

West Shore Cycling: http://www.meetup.com/West-Shore-Cycling/

MEC Victoria Road-Ride Cycling: http://www.meetup.com/West-Shore-Cycling/

Greater Victoria Green Team: http://www.meetup.com/Greater-Victoria-Green-Team/

Net Squared Victoria: http://www.meetup.com/NetSquared-Victoria-a-nonprofit-technology-meetup/

Cowichan Valley Outdoor Club: http://www.meetup.com/Cowichan-Valley-Outdoor-Club/

Cowichan Valley Walking/Hiking Group: http://www.meetup.com/Cowichan-Valley-walking-hiking-group/

EVERY WEEK

Biweekly. OUR ECOVILLAGE Educational Tours.10-12:30pm with option to stay on for lunch in OUR Zero Mile Meal Eatery. Learn all legal and regulatory work for permaculture, natural building, and sustainable community design while delving into the back of systems and inside cob/strawbale/solar/alt systems. Scheduled volunteer days also avail. info@ourecovillage.org   250-743-3067  www.ourecovillage.org

Biweekly. Garry Oak Ecosystem Restoration at Fort Rodd Hill. Help us win the battle against invasive species and assist in our meadow project at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. Scheduled volunteer days. frh.volunteer@pc.gc.ca  250-812-8133  http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/bc/fortroddhill/activ/activ2.aspx

Every day, 10am – 5pm Clothing for Conservation Fundraiser with Habitat Acquisition Trust: visit Hemp & Company, 1312 Government St. $10 from every purchase of the featured Celebration Top goes to HAT. Makes a great gift!

Every day, 9am-4:30pm The forest is always ‘green’ here in Goldstream. With over 8 km of hiking trails you will be sure to find one of our unique trees, from Western Red Cedar, Black Cottonwood, Red Alder to Douglas Fir, Garry Oak and Arbutus. Stop in at the Goldstream Nature House for up to date trail information. 250-478-9414 or goldstream@naturehouse.ca

Every Day (except Monday) Victoria Public Market, Hudson’s Bay, Douglas St. Maryanne Carmack, marycarmack@victoriapublicmarket.com 250 884 8552 www.victoriapublicmarket.com

Every Mon, 4-6:30pm Free Family Cooking Classes *pre-registration required* – Cowichan Green Community – 360 Duncan Street, Duncan, BC – Jennifer Dorby #250.748.8506 or by email jennifer@cowichangreencommunity.org https://cgcf.ca/projects/chow-cooking-classes/

Every Mon, 10am -12pm Brodick/Bow Parks (Saanich) Invasive Species removal. Volunteers needed. Training, gloves, and tools provided. No dogs. Judy 250-472-0515

Every Monday, 4-6:30pm Cowichan Green Community Chow Down Family Cooking Classes. Free. Visit https://cgcf.ca/projects/chow-cooking-classes/ for more details. Registration is necessary by emailing or calling Jennifer: jennifer@cowichangreencommunity.org/ 250-748-8506

Every Tue, 9am Tuesday Morning Birding. Meet foot of Bowker Ave, waterfront off Beach Drive in Oak Bay. Bill Dancer 250-721-5273. Novice and experienced birders all welcome.

Every Wed, 11-6pm Haliburton Food Box Program. Receive a luscious weekly box of certified organic seasonal produce from the farmers who grow the food. 741 Haliburton Rd (off the Pat Bay Highway), Victoria www.haliburtonfarm.org

Every Wed and Sun, 9am Bird Walks with naturalists, Swan Lake Nature Sanctuary, 3873 Swan Lake Rd. Margaret Lidkea 479-0211

Every Wed 7-8:30pm Oneness Wednesdays Meditation Circle at Church of Truth, 111 Superior Street;  Everyone welcome to drop in.   By Donation   http://cotvictoria.ca/oneness/

Every Wed, 7pm Cultivating a Lifestyle of Harmony & Balance in Rhythm with Nature with Renee Lindstrom at Oneness Wednesday at the Church of Truth, 111 Superior Street (James Bay).  Free or by donation  http://cotvictoria.ca/oneness/  

Every Thursday, 1-7pm Food Garden Volunteers needed, throughout the summer of 2018. Gain skills in horticulture, permaculture, irrigation and outreach in Banfield Commons and Orchard. 521 Craigflower Road, south of the Vic West Community Association. foodgardens@victoriawest.ca https://vicwestfoodsecurity.org/

Every Thur and Sat. Volunteer events at Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary. Charlotte Houston restoration@swanlake.bc.ca.

Every Sat, 10-12 Moss Street Market for homegrown produce, homemade food, baking and handicrafts, music, kids activities. Thurlow St, Fairfield. www.MossStreetMarket.com

Every Sat, 8am Morning Birding. See http://www.vicnhs.bc.ca/calendar.html for each week’s location. VNHS. Novice and experienced birders all welcome.

Every Sat, 9-12pm Beacon Hill Park Ivy Pull. Volunteers welcome. Cornelia 250-920-3556

Every Sun, 1-3pm No Ivy League. Join the Friends of Uplands Park to remove English ivy, and help restore the endangered Garry Oak Ecosystem, and protect 24 rare plants. Tools, gloves and the Best Practices instruction provided. Meet at Cattle Point, near the kiosks.